FranklyWrite

Live Life; Practice Writing

The hard part about having Standard Poodles is people don’t think they are real dogs. They think they are stuffed animals.

All breeds have their PR challenges, but imagine walking down the street and people suddenly run out and hug your dog. Or if they play rough people say, “She’s like a real dog.” People think all Poodles are girls.

Poodles are real dogs.

-All Poodle owners ever

Charming, he’s the white Poodle, is the first dog I raised from a puppy. I wanted another black one, but Charming had a great temperament and I’ll pick temperament over color any day of the week.

Charming all fluffed and puffed at about 5 months

He is Cute

I planned to attend the Dog Bowl in Frankenmuth, Michigan, on Memorial Day weekend when Charming would be 5 months old. It was important he walked well on a leash.

The first time I took him around the block the people on the corner had their son’s dog staying with them and it scared the crap out of him. The dog is marked like a Boarder Collie. After this, Charming barked at any dog marked like a Boarder Collie–and not a normal bark; a rolling alarm bark only a Poodle can do.

I socialized him with other dogs and he was always good. He went to the Dog Bowl and was great. He went with his dog buddies, Gunner and Grinder. Gunner is the same age as Charming. The only incident was when we walked up a hill and there was a Boarder Collie at the top. Charming went off—Ra Ra Ra RAAAAA! Ra Ra Ra RAAAAAAA! About six times. Everyone stopped and looked at me. The Boarder Collie didn’t know what to do.

The Dog Park

The real problem began at the dog park when Charming was about a year old. I want to be clear. Charming is not dog aggressive and has never started a fight or attacked another dog. However, his behavior, if allowed to continue, could lead to a fight.

All my dogs learn to walk off-leash because I hike though the woods with them. There isn’t a need to take them to a dog park for exercise. I joined in order to go with the friend who owns Charming’s buddies, Gunner and Grinder. And to meet other local dog owners. In New York I met the most interesting people at the dog park.

There was a Weimaraner puppy at the dog park about 8 months old. The two dogs played together fine several times. They were about the same size, but the Weimaraner outweighed Charming by about 20 lbs. One day, the Weimaraner attacked Charming and to my surprise Charming stood his ground and the Weimaraner backed-off. Unfortunately, the Weimaraner’s owners saw it as ‘playing.’ I knew it wasn’t and stayed clear of the Weimaraner.

When Standard Poodles play they do this thing where they spin in a circle and hit each other with their noses. It’s not so pronounced when they play with other Poodles because the other Poodles are hip to the move. But when they play with other breeds it is very pronounced. They go faster and faster and it scares the crap out of dogs not used to it.

Poodles are very light boned dogs. A Standard Poodle may appear bigger than a Labrador Retriever, but the Poodle will weigh 50 lbs and the Retriever 70 or 80 lbs. The spinning action is a great defense because with their fluffy coats they look like a very strange animal. Poodles use their brains to get the better of other dogs at play or in a fight.

After the encounter with the Weimaraner, Charming went on the defensive with all smooth hair dogs at the dog park. He’d show them who’s boss first. Charming is a very confident dog who will submit to a more confident dog. Unfortunately, there were none in the Woodhaven Michigan Municipal Dog Park.

He’d play with the Pit Bulls and do his spin and poke and they would not know what to do. They’d run, he’d chase; it was big fun for Charming. Soon he’d have them hiding under benches. He’d peak under the bench like, “Well, are we playing or not?” This is when I’d intervene.

It wasn’t long before he learned he could intimidate dogs twice his size. Ever see a Great Pyrenees try to hide under a bench? The more they ran from him, the bolder he got. It became self-rewarding. I was unable to stop him. When he started intimidating dogs entering the park, I decided to no longer take him there.

I read posts on the Dog Park’s Facebook page about The White Poodle. The Pit Bull owners were the maddest. Not because of any real safety issue, but because their Pit Bulls were afraid of a Poodle.

“I will not have my Pit intimidated by a F____g French Poodle!!” one person wrote. I laughed. My little Charming was infamous.

It’s not MY Dog

At first I thought it was just that dog park and those people, it can’t be my sweet puppy Charming. My sweet little puppy could not be a bully. He is just playing. It’s not his fault the other dogs are afraid. Charming loved the dog park. The photo at the top of the page was taken at The Woodhaven Municipal Dog Park.

I tried him at another, smaller dog park with dogs he knows and he started to bully his buddy, Gunner. It was because Gunner was neutered, I told myself.

Charming would pick-out what he believed was the leader of the ‘other’ pack (GG, Henry, Gunner and Grinder were Charming’s pack) and pick on the leader mercilessly. He’d follow them around and spin and poke and spin poke until they were cowering under their owner’s feet. Sometimes he would nip them because he wanted them to run.

I had to admit it…

My Poodle is a bully.

The only time Charming does not do this is if my sister’s dog, CBGB, is present because Charming acknowledges CB as the ultimate pack leader. CB once made a horse go away and Charming has worshiped him every since. I often wonder if Charming would bully other dogs at the dog park if CB was there. I’ll never know. CB is dog aggressive and cannot go to dog parks.

CB–Charming’s idol

I no longer bother with dog parks. GG never liked them and Henry, my black Standard, could care less as long as he goes where I go. They can be a good thing if you don’t have a yard and you’re not comfortable with allowing your dog to run loose in unfenced, open spaces.

Charming runs with a pack of hounds owned by me, my sister and our friend Sue. We meet at Field of Dreams (FOD) Flying Field in Sanford Road Park, Milan, Michigan. I don’t usually have an issue with Charming, but CB is present.

The Pack; Charming, Henry, CB, GG, Binky. (Not pictured: Maggie and Max.

Just today we introduced a new member to the pack, Max, Maggie’s Puppy. Charming had to be on a leash because Max was afraid of both Poodles. He had never seen fluffy dogs before. Charming was going to take full advantage of his fear. CB was ready to intervene, but we thought it best to put Charming on leash and let them get used to each other in stages as Max was ready. By the end of the walk, Max played with Henry.

To this day Charming is not aggressive and often visits in the hospitals.  It is important to know your dog. This bulling behavior could start a fight in a dog park and as a dog owner it is your responsibility to recognize it and act accordingly. 

As I write this Charming is 5 years old and has never started a fight, but he has also never backed down from one. He still does not like Boarder Collies.

Meet Max the newest member of the pack.

Have you ever had to admit “It IS your dog?”

Let me know in the comments below.

Categories: Dogs

If you’ve not seen it, heres a link to the new Peloton commercial. Or the best I could find since they have re-edited it due to the backlash.

I’m not sure what they were going for with this ad, but this is how I see it.

A husband buys his Yoga instructor wife a Peloton bike for Christmas. Maybe she wanted one, it’s hard to tell, but the expression on her face seems to indicate she did not. She records her workout through-out the year including one morning where it appears her husband wakes her up to do her work-out, which she than says was worth it. Then it’s the next Christmas and she says, “I had no idea how much this would change me.”

It is clear this was intended as one of those feel-good commercials Hallmark used to be so good at. And that’s what’s so warped about it.

Let’s break it down. A husband gives his beautiful and fit wife an exercise bike for Christmas. This in itself is narcissistic and sexist. She looks like a Yoga instructor. He looks more out of shape than she does. This is the age of #MeTo and there is no place for this type of sexist body shaming. If you look at other ads for Peloton there isn’t one person using their equipment that looks like they need to use it or looks like a ‘normal’ person. Most of the women appear to have had Brazilian butt lifts.

Giving some one a gift of any type of exercise equipment unless they expressly asked for it, is in poor taste and says you don’t look good enough to me. And this one is even worse because it says you don’t look $2,200 and $40 a month not good to me.

He never uses the bike. Not once. I have two theories on that. 1. His work took him out of the country for a year and he doesn’t want her to get fat while he’s gone. 2. He’s the one waking her up at 6 am to do her workout. Both are creepy .

The worst part of all. The next Christmas she not only did not throw him and the bike out the door, but she likes it and claims it has changed her. How? Is she thinner? Can she run more miles? She has the same asshole husband. Bad, bad storytelling.

If I were to create a commercial for Peloton I would make it clear the person wanted the bike and show both of them using it. I would show how they changed; winning a marathon, having the energy to do more with the kids…I’d think of something. It’s not enough to say a character changed. It must be concretized. The audience must see it for themselves. It’s the audience that should be saying, “Wow, look how it changed her.”

Back to the point about Peloton ads not showing a single person who looked like they needed to use a stationary bike. I do not think exercise equipment is only for fat people. Skinny people need to stay that way. But there isn’t one single ad–not one– that shows a ‘normal’ person using one of these. Not that I could find, anyway, and I think I know why. A fat person would look awkward on a Peloton. It’s that simple. Can you imagine my big butt on that tiny seat? My butt is not big in a good way; it’s wide and flat. They don’t want that image associated with their product. They were designed for skinny people of privilege. And hey fine, live and let live. Right?

Wrong. This commercial has been running a lot. Imagine a girl of about 14 or so seeing this beautiful, thin woman being fat shamed by her husband, a person who loves her. What is she going to think? This is the real issue. Most likely this girl is not going to say anything if she has body image issues. She most likely has no idea she does. She is going to compare her body to this woman’s and get the idea she is not good enough. Can you imagine what a young girl who doesn’t have a model like body is going to think? It’s a horrible message. A dangerous one.

I have an offer for Peloton. I’m in my fifties and could be more fit and loose some weight. If they give me a bike and subscription for a year, I will contract to workout 3-4 times a week and record my progress. At the end of year, they will be able to use my change in their commercial.

I know they will never take me up on this for two reasons. I’m not a beauty and the image of me with my big old butt on their seat does not fit their privileged brand. Second, I don’t think their product is worth the powder to blow it to you know where. I don’t think it works. I think it will do nothing for me.

It has been proven over and over that pushing yourself to your limits is not the best way to workout. To me the benefits of a Spin class come from the communal aspect of it. There is a psychological benefit to sweating with a group of people in a stimulus rich environment like a spin classroom. You do not get this riding a stationary bike alone at home. Sorry. You just don’t.

I own a Schwinn Airdyne exercise bike that is about 40 years old. It came with a big old seat for a normal size butt. The seat is broken. I will have it fixed. It does not connect to anything. It uses air to create resistance and creates a breeze that keeps you comfortable and sends all dust bunnies in the basement scurrying for cover. It tracks your miles mechanically. You are the only power it requires. It also has a stand so you can read a book or magazine while working out. LOL. If I don’t hear from Peloton by New Year, I commit to working out on the Airdyne bike and sharing my progress thought out 2020.

What do you think of the Peloton ad?

Let me know in the comments below.

The word change has many meanings–make different, stop and start new, what’s left in your pocket.  Evolve is a better word for the flow of life because change is often viewed as abrupt. This blog is evolving.

I am a writer. Have been since I was a kid. Writing is an active escape. You can solve any problem on the page. Writing about writing, well, it’s helpful to new writers but does nothing for the writer and it’s a lot of work.

I am a writer with life experience and that is what this blog will evolve to reflect. I did some rebranding and changed my masthead photo and the tag line to Live Life and Practice Writing. It used to be Practice Writing.

About the blogger.

Born in Riverview, Michigan, I spent the first 30 years of my life observing life in the this Detroit suburb. Wayne State Univerisity on the pay as you go plan was my next evolution. While working full-time for a company that customized cars for the auto industry, I attended Wayne State in the evenings. I will never forget the night on top of the Science Building in January in Downtown Detroit. This was after working an 8 hour day. It was 26 degrees with wind. We were observing Jupiter and suppose the calculate it’s distance from Earth. My interest in astronomy was lost that night.

I took an evening acting class to help learn about character. One of the requirements was to see a play. I fell in love with the Theatre. My original plan was to study literary writing and journalism, but finding some of the professors in the English Department a little frightening and seeing a wonderful production of “Cyrano,” at the Hillberry Theatre; changed all that.

A million stories flood my mind. So many moments that changed me.

Wayne State lead to getting into graduate school. I honestly thought I’d end up at the University of Iowa or some place like it. But I got into The Actors Studio Drama School at the New School Univerisity in New York. My first reaction was that I couldn’t go. If not for the encouragement of my professors at Wayne State, I would not have gone.

Life evolved. One day I was living in the small suburb of Detroit and the next I was living in New York City, Upper West Side, Manhattan; 115th and Broadway. The greatest experience of my life. It took me one week to become a New Yorker and even though I don’t live in the City today, I will always be a New Yorker. I think I always was. A million stories.

I got my Master degree in Playwriting, became a member of the BMI Musical Theatre Workshop, taught playwriting, read scripts for several theatre companies and many, many other things. I lived there for 15 years.

Evolution. My mother died and a few years later my Dad had to have a mid-thigh leg amputation. I felt it was my duty to go home. Everything was falling on sister who lived the closest. I was doing okay in New York, but the crush of student debt prevented me taking some of the chances I needed to, to be a professional writer and I lacked what I call the killer instinct. I wasn’t doing well enough to do my fair share by sending money home.

Returning to the house were I grew-up was the hardest evolution. The best I can say after 8 years, is that I’ve accepted it.

I inherited my Dad’s Standard Poodle since he could no longer walk him and fell in love with this breed. They are not a dog for everyone, but Merlin made living with my father bearable. He was a dog and a hobby. I learned to groom him myself and got pretty good at it. The one thing I missed in New York was a dog of my own.

I had to learn to cook because my Dad was supposed to be on a diabetic diet. I thought I’d write about that experience on a blog called, “The Rube Cook.” It became clear after the 7th recipe I was no longer a rube. Not to mention the hours it took to photograph the food and get the instructions correct. The blog is on blogspot. Not the best platform for recipes.

Eventually, I came to WordPress and started a writing a blog.

Writing About Writing

There is so much more to write about than writing. And there are so many writers who do it better than me. Writer’s have to live life and that is what I hope show with this blog. Yes, I will impart my writing wisdom–try to stop me. But I will also include stories about how I got here. Entertaining stories, I hope. It will include informative articles about a variety of topics that are researched and, where possible, experts are consulted. You will meet my Dad, my sister, my brother, my friends my dogs and my cats. I will share recipes because a writer’s gotta eat and may get into topics like leash laws, dog training, Poodle grooming and being a good neighbor. And every now and than I may drop an episode of a fiction story.

What is your evolution? Let me know in the comments below.

 

It’s scary—you let your dogs out, you go to let them in and they are not there. What do you do?

Or you’re out walking and suddenly a firework goes off; your dog takes-off in fear. What do you do?

Prevention

Prevention is worth a pound of cure. The best way to minimize losing your dog is by teaching them you are their safe-haven and source of all fun. 

The very first thing you must, must, MUST do is train a solid recall. The best way to do this is NEVER, ever, no matter what, punish your dog in any way for coming to you. No matter what they did or how mad you are, always reward them. From day one, puppy or adult, if your dog comes to you, reward them. Pet them, give them food, whatever you can do in that moment. 

 Dogs live in the present. They have no idea you are mad at them because they ran way from you 5 minutes ago no matter how many times you explain it to them or how loud you yell. They only know they came to you and got smacked on the nose or their collar pulled  or it seemed to agitate you.

Work on recall from day one using fabulous rewards. Use a word other than their name, humans tend to say a dog’s name to often for it to be an effective command. Start by teaching them to sit. Then teach them to stay moving farther away each time. Practice this in 10 minute sessions a few times a day.

You can train weeks old puppies; keep in mind they have short attention spans and need lots of repetition. Teaching at 9 weeks; the puppy learns how to learn, “Oh, that word means I do this and I get a treat.” There are many training systems out there, find one you like and stick with it.

If you adopted an older dog, a great way to bond and develop trust is to take a basic obedience class. I cannot stress enough the importance of this in preventing the loss of a dog. They may still take off at times, but training increases the chance of the them returning on their own by 80% or more.

Walk your dog

This is as important as training your dog and the most important factor in you being the source of all fun. Dogs who escape often do so because they are bored and have excess energy. Walking and playing with your dog drains that excess energy and removes the need to find other outlets for it like escaping the yard.

Teaching your dog to walk properly on a leash makes walking fun for both of you. The more often you walk your dog, the easier it is. If you only walk occasionally, it is much harder. I walk my dogs 2 times a day every day, but I know not every one can do this. Short walks every day are great, three times a week is better than once. Running the dog along a bicycle is a great energy drainer for very energetic dogs. A tired dog is a good dog. 

Walking is not just for exercise. Leash walks are mental exercise for your dog; smelling and catching up on neighborhood critter news, is great mental stimulation and can tire a dog faster than a run. Also, it satisfies the dogs urge to smell whats outside of the yard; the dog learns the neighborhood and the neighborhood gets to know your dog. 

Very often a dog is found and only weeks later the finder learns the dog lives down the street. It’s also a great way to socialize your dog. Introduce him to any neighbors interested. Knowing the people around you helps if you should lose your dog, find a dog or have a dog issue with a neighbor.

Off the Leash

Find places to walk your dog off-leash. Walking off-leash teaches a dog to be with you without a leash and makes it less likely they will take-off at any opportunity.  I drop my leashes all the time, but my dogs don’t run off for two reasons; I don’t panic and they are used to walking with me off-leash.

Yes, you are taking a chance when you walk off-leash, but if you have done your basic training, you should be fine. With puppies there is a period of time where they won’t go far from you. This is the ideal time to teach off-leash ettiequte and recall. Carry treats and very calmly call them to you every so often or call them back if they go to far. It is important you are calm when doing this type training so pick a place your feel comfortable. I like to train mine in a Marsh because it’s surrounded on all sides by water; not every one is comfortable in a Marsh. Find what works for you. Reward, reward, reward.

There are some dogs that can never be walked off-leash, you need to be able to read your dog. The bottom line here is if you are not comfortable, if it’s going to make you anxious, don’t do it.

If your dog runs to far

There may come a time when your dog tests you and runs farther away than they should. It’s hard, but do not chase them. This only encourages them to keep running. They may have done it for fun or because they saw a critter. Your state of worry will communicate there is danger and they need find it by running farther still. You should calmly turn around and walk the other direction calling the dog in a normal, cheerful voice. It would be a good idea to have treats on hand to reward them when they come to you. Yes, there could be cars and all that, but I have never had this not work. You will not catch them by chasing them.

When your dog goes Walkabout

First, do not panic. When you first discover the dog is missing, stay still and listen for other dogs in the neighborhood barking. Follow the barking. This is the best way to find a dog. If you are not sure how long the dog has been gone, still try this but listen further away. Walk the neighborhood and listen. The one time I did have a dog wander out of my yard, this is how a found him. I got on my bike and followed the barking dogs. There was Barney a few streets away running the fence with a barking dog.

Next, if you walk your dog and have a route you often take, walk that route. You are likely to find the dog somewhere along it. Make sure there is some one at home incase the dog returns on his own. I’ve only had two dogs run away in a lifetime of having dogs and I found both by these two methods. What follows is from my experience helping others find their dogs and returning lost dogs to their owners.

Do not think or say your dog was stolen. Although this does happen, it is less likely than the dog wandering off. Do not write this on social media or on any posters you make. It is the surest way to never find your dog. If the dog wasn’t stolen and someone found it, they may hesitate to contact you for fear of being accused of stealing. If the dog was taken, the thieves may not return it even if you offer a reward, if you start by accusing. Often people who take dogs do so for the reward money. Remember the goal is to get the dog back.

If you have searched the walking routes and followed the barking dogs and your dog has not returned home; call the local police and make a report that the dog is missing.  Call any near-by cities and and make the report and leave your contact information. You do not need to speak to animal control or the shelter. If the police receive a call of a lost dog, they will call you. This is how I have returned 99% of the lost dogs I have found.

Don’t forget to call your vet and report the dog missing and your groomer, if you use one. Anyone who would know the dog, notify.

Post your dog’s picture on social media for your local area. Start close to home and then move further out. I like Next-door.com and neighborhood Facebook Groups for this. Most areas have a Facebook group for lost dogs.

As more time goes by, visit local shelters, don’t rely on photos because dogs can look very different after a few hours out on their own. 

Make flyers and canvas the neighborhood and talk to neighbors, give them flyers, don’t just post them. It is better to do this on foot or bike than in a car.  Always make sure there is some one at home incase the dog returns on it’s own.

Hopefully your dog will be found.

A few more tips

Microchipping is the best way to ensure your dog is returned if something weird happens like they get trapped inside a delivery truck and end-up half a state away. Keep your contact information attached to the chip up-to-date.

An ID tag on the collar is good, but when a dog runs away it is often at a time when it is not wearing it’s collar or the collar is lost on the walkabout.

Secure you fence and gate. Leaning something against the gate isn’t good enough. If you can move it, so can your dog.

Never walk your dog on a retractable leash. Despite the handle and the claims of the manufacturers, these leashes are hard to hold. Often dogs are lost by the owner dropping the leash and the leash chasing the dog. These stories usually do not have happy endings.

No matter how distraught you are, be nice to any one trying to help you find your dog no matter how annoying they are.

Keep calling local police and going to local shelters. It’s hard, but ask if any dead dogs where found when you call. It is better to know than not know.

Social media is a great tool for reuniting lost dogs with owners, but don’t rely on it only. Keep refreshing your social media posts.

 

Please leave your tips below. If you lost a dog and found it, I’d love the hear the story. Please post it in the comments. Have a favorite training method? I’d like to hear that to!

“Will you bring your homemade spaghetti meatballs?”

The Academy Award of home cooks everywhere. I get this all the time because this recipe is that good. People assume I make it from scratch and I don’t correct them. The meatballs are from scratch; the sauce is not, but it’s close. Here’s the recipe along with a few tips.

Continue reading

When I first heard about Anthony Bourdain’s death, I didn’t believe it. Then it was all over the internet and news. It must true, he committed suicide. Over and over it was said, he didn’t seem like the type and the number for the suicide preventions hot line was given. I don’t know, it didn’t seem right for a life like his.

Suicide has no type was as far as I could articulate my feelings. Then I read this Facebook post by Kimberly Stewart and said, “Yes, that’s it!”

Kim graciously allowed me to share her feelings.

Continue reading

A skillet cookie. I am laughing at the irony. I finally include recipes on this blog and the first two are not things you should eat if trying to cut calories. But here’s the thing, you are going to cheat so if you do, it is better to eat goodies you make than the processed ones you buy at the store. At least you know what’s in it.

The Story

When I was in college at Wayne State University in Detroit, we often ate at the wonderful Traffic Jams restaurant on Canfield. They have great food, but what I remember most is a dessert called, “A Cookie in a Fancy Dress.” It was a chocolate chip cookie served with TJ’s homemade vanilla ice cream. We were poor so we’d order one to share. It was delicious and the name appealed to our theatrical sensibilities. It was always a good time.

I have tried many chocolate chip cookies and never found one that tasted like that cookie. When I read the tips on The Foodie Delights blog for making a skillet cookie, I said, “Could this be it? Chopped chocolate, less white sugar and malted milk powder?”

I had to try it.

I will be using my Grandma’s 11 1/2 inch skillet that dates back to 1965. This skillet is larger and heftier than my older ones and has a fabulous surface. If you haven’t guessed, I am a metal head, that is a collector of cast iron cookware.

A Cookie in a Fancy Dress

  • Servings: 6-10
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

A gooey, chewy reward after a long day of writing.

Best if served with a good vanilla ice cream and chocolate shavings. This recipe was modified from the Nestlé Toll House Recipe. I used Baker’s chocolate bars; unsweetened (100% cacao), semi-sweet (56% cacao) and German’s sweet Chocolate (48% cacao.) You can also include some white chocolate. Chop the chocolate with a chopping knife and not a food processor.

It’s hard to shave chocolate in your kitchen, use some of the chopped chocolate or Nestlé chocolate chips of any kind to trim the dress’

For the ice cream, I am useing Calder’s vanilla which has 5 ingredients and I can pronounce all 5. Calder’s is a local dairy.


Credit: Nestlé, The Foodie Delights blog, Cynthia Franks

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 heaping table spoon of plain malted milk powder
  • 2 cups (about 12 ounces) chopped chocolate of different varieties.
  • 1 1/2 cups (2 1/2 sticks) butter, softened not melted
  • 1/3 cup white cane sugar
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanillia (if possible natural vanilla and not extract)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 well-seasoned 10 to 12 inch cast iron skillet

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees with rack in the center.
  2. Generously butter, with softened not melted butter, a 10 to 12 inch cast iron skillet.
  3. On a piece of parchment paper over a cutting board, chop the chocolate.
  4. In a mixing bowl combine flour, baking soda, salt, malted milk powder, swipe all the chopped chocolate bits off the parchment paper and into the bowl.
  5. In a larger bowl, mix together the butter, sugars, vanilla and eggs.
  6. Add the dry ingredients at one time and mix until well combined.
  7. Press all cookie dough into the well-buttered cast iron skillet.
  8. Bake in the oven for 35 minutes or until the sides are nice golden brown, but the middle is still giggly to the touch.
  9. Remove from oven and allow to set in cast iron skillet for at least 45 minutes.
  10. Cut into desired pieces and remove from skillet. Serve with vanilla ice cream and chocolate shavings or pieces.

End note

This cookie is great with ice cream. It is great crumbled into the ice cream. It is not so great on it’s own.

Next time I will make two cookies out of this amount of dough. I felt the cookie was to thick. I’d cut the cooking time down a bit.

I think I would do 1/2 cup white sugar or use milk chocolate in place of the unsweetened chocolate. The ice cream adds the needed sweetness, but if not serving this á la mode, it needs a sweetness boost. I would add some white chocolate into the mix.

I’m going to look at some other cookie dough recipes and try this again.

Writing a novel is very different from writing a play. The story telling is the same, but the mechanics of it are different as I am finding out.

I know the play writing process. I know it’s different for each story, but I have a good idea what I need to do to get to my pay-off. Once I get the characters working, I almost don’t need to think about the writing until the final tweaks. It becomes a matter of getting the characters to do the things required to tell the story.

In writing a novel, I feel certain that there will come a point where my characters take over, but it takes so much longer to get there. I need to build the sets and do the lighting using my words. It is hard work. And often boring work. Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: